Tag Archives: Holden Thorp

Protesters were right to shut down the racist Tancredo

The following commentary by Kosta Harlan is from Fight Back! News:

fight-racism-goodeStudents at University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill made national headlines last week when they confronted the racist ex-congressman Tom Tancredo. 200 students marched, shouted down, or silently protested Tancredo. When 60 students chanted in the lobby of the building where he was to speak, police attacked the demonstration with pepper spray. Two women were thrown to the floor, another protester had her hair pulled by a cop and several people were pushed into the walls. The police drove the students out by threatening them with tasers. Shortly after we were pushed out, a window was broken and the event was shut down.

Thousands of articles, commentaries, and editorials have been written on this event. Most of it is a waste of everyone’s time. In typical mainstream media fashion, most of the coverage has completely turned reality on its head. Like Malcolm X would have said, they make the victim look like the villain and the oppressors look like the oppressed.

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Chapel Hill: An Open Letter to Chancellor Holden Thorp

The following open letter, along with numerous other letters of support and statements of solidarity, is from the UNC Chapel Hill SDS website. Though I may not agree with every word of it, I am reposting here as it gets into some of the debate about ‘free speech’ raging over UNC students recent and heroic protest of white supremacist Tom Tancredo. For more information, please see UNC Chapel Hill students stand up for Immigrant Rights.

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An Open Letter to Chancellor Holden Thorp

April 16, 2009

Dear Chancellor Thorp:

I want to express my concerns over the events of April 14, 2009. Currently, I am a Doctoral Candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Department of Communication Studies specializing in the rhetoric of social protest. I have been a part of the UNC system for 6 years and a student and member of the UNC-Chapel Hill community for over 4 years. During that time I have witnessed some of UNC’s proudest, shining moments and consider those less shining to be opportunities for growth and progress. As a member of this community, a first-hand witness to the protest events on April 14th, and as a scholar of free speech issues, I believe it is my responsibility to address what I see as precisely one of those opportunities.

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