Tag Archives: People’s Republic of China

Democratic Republic of Congo celebrates 50 years of independence

The following article is from Zimbabwe’s Herald:

By Morris Mkwate in KINSHASA, DRC

PRESIDENT Mugabe arrived here yesterday to join in celebrations to mark the vast country’s 50 years of independence from Belgian colonial rule.

He was welcomed by Harare’s Ambassador to Kinshasa, Mr John Mayowe, DRC Prime Minister Adolf Muzitu, DRC Defence Minister Charles Mwandosimba and Zimbabwe embassy officials.

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Presentation by Harpal Brar to the Stalin Society on the Comintern and the Chinese Revolution

Here is a  video of a talk by Harpal Brar, Chairman of the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist) to the Stalin Society on the line of Joseph Stalin and the Communist International regarding the Chinese Revolution. See also Comrade Brar’s article Stalin and the Chinese Revolution.

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Soong Ching Ling and Women’s Liberation in China

As part of the continuing series of articles on women’s liberation in honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8th) The Marxist-Leninist is posting the following article by Soong Ching Ling. Soong Ching Ling is most famous as the wife of Sun Yat Sen, the founder of the nationalist Kuomintang Party in China. She was a great revolutionary in her own right and served as Co-Chairman of the Peoples’ Republic of China from 1968 to 1972, and was honored shortly before her death in 1981 by the award of the honorific title of President of the PRC.  In the Soviet Union too she was highly honored, in 1951 receiving the Stalin Peace Prize. For more on her exemplary life, see the article Soong Ching Ling and the Women’s Movement in China from the latest issue of Lalkar.

Women’s Liberation in China
by Soong Ching Ling

HISTORY has proved that Women’s Liberation in China—women obtain equal status with men—began with the democratic revolution, but will be completed only in the socialist revolution.

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Claudia Jones, Communist

In honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8th), The Marxist-Leninist will post a number of articles throughout the month of March dealing specifically with the issue of women’s liberation. The following article is from latest issue of the British journal, Lalkar:

Claudia Jones, communist
A presentation made to the Stalin Society by Ella Rule on 22 March 2009

Today is Mother’s Day. Claudia Jones too thought often of her mother. At a party given for her in New York, Claudia spoke about the early influences that pointed her in the direction of communism:

On this, my 37th birthday, I think of my mother. My mother, a machine worker in a garment factory, died when she was just the same age I am today – 37 years old. I think I began then to develop an understanding of the suffering of my people and my class and to look for a way to end them.”[1]

Right from the start, Claudia realised that what she and her family was suffering in New York was also being suffered by working-class people of every race and nationality, even if black people and women were often suffering more.

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92nd Anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution: Lenin and Stalin as Mass Leaders

To mark the 92nd anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution on November 7th 2009, I am posting the following article by William Z. Foster from 1939, “Lenin and Stalin as Mass Leaders“:

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The legacy of October lives on!

The great revolution of October, 1917, which abolished Russian capitalism and landlordism and set up the Soviet government, resulted in the establishment of socialism throughout one-sixth of the earth, and is now surging forward to the building of communism, constitutes the deepest-going, farthest-reaching, and most fundamental mass movement in all human history. The two chief figures in the Communist Party heading this epic struggle—Lenin and Stalin—have continuously displayed, in its course, unequalled qualities as political leaders of the working class and of the toiling people generally.

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Stalin and the Chinese Revolution

stal_nalb3The following presentation was made by Harpal Brar, Chairman of the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist), to the Stalin Society on 18 October 2009 to mark the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China and the forthcoming 130th anniversary of the birth of Stalin. It is taken from Chapter 13 of his book, Trotskyism or Leninism? It was again published and is being reprinted here from the November/December 2009 issue of the British anti-imperialist and Marxist-Leninist journal, Lalkar:

Stalin and the Chinese Revolution:
Two lines on the Chinese Revolution – the line of the Comintern and Stalin versus the line of the Trotskyist opposition

In the latter half of the 1920s the Trotskyist opposition (Trotsky, Zinoviev, Radek and Kamenev) accused the ‘Stalinist bureaucracy’ i.e. the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (Bolshevik) [CPSU(B)] and the Comintern of selling the Chinese Revolution and the Chinese communists down the river – of betraying the Chinese Revolution.

This slander has since then been picked up, and repeated thousands of times, by the Trotskyite counter-revolutionaries, revisionist renegades, social democrats, and even by some dubious Marxist-Leninists.  Every attempt is made by this gentry to invent sharp difference of opinion between Stalin and Mao Zedong, between the line of the Comintern, which was the same as that of Stalin and the CPSU(B), on the one hand, and that of Mao Zedong, on the other hand, on the question of the Chinese Revolution.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

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CPGB-ML: Study of Mao Zedong’s “On Contradiction”

20060310165606611The following is from the website of the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist):

Theory: Mao’s ‘On contradiction’
A masterly exposition of how to use dialectics to change the world by the leader of the Chinese revolution.

Mao wrote the article ‘On contradiction’ in 1937 to explain the dialectical method of analysis. He did this to counter the development of dogmatic approaches to study and practice that had developed within the Chinese Communist Party.

He also sought to explain international events, particularly the struggle between Marxist-Leninist leadership and the right and, later, left opportunism within the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

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