Tag Archives: Prachanda

Nepal’s Maoists Seize Kathmandu

Maoist leader Pushpa Kamal Dahal waves to the crowd during the inauguration of a new autonomous state in Kathmandu December 16, 2009. Maoist declared the capital Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Lalitpur districts as the new Newa autonomous state. REUTERS/Shruti Shrestha

The following report is from The Economic Times:

KATHMANDU: Maoists on Wednesday announced the seizure of the Nepalese capital Kathmandu declaring it an autonomous region, after storming into heavily guarded Durbar Square, in a development that could trigger a new political confrontation.

Waving red flags, 5000 militant cadres forced their way into the Durbar Square city centre where their chief Prachanda declared Kathmandu valley as the Newa Autonomous State. The Maoists, who have already announced formation of parallel governments in nine districts and paid little heed to warnings by the Nepali Congress, to desist from such tactics as it may lead to “biggest political and social confrontation”.

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Baburam Bhattarai: On Nepal’s Social Revolution

Maoist leader Dr. Baburam Bhattarai shouts anti-government slogans during a sit in protest in front of the main secretariat Singha Durbar in Kathmandu November 13, 2009. Maoist activists closed all the entrances to the main government secretariat on the second day of their protest against the president's reinstatement of the army chief. REUTERS/Shruti Shrestha

The following interview with Dr. Baburam Bhattarai, a leader of the Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), was conducted by members of the World People’s Resistance Movement (Britain & Ireland) who recently spent six weeks on a delegation in Nepal during August and September 2009 :


Nepal: Interview with Baburam Bhattarai

by WPRM (Britain)

WPRM: Thank you for meeting with us today. In your article in The Worker #4 ‘The Political Economy of the People’s War’ you write that “the transformation of one social system into another, or the destruction of the old by the new, always involves force and a revolutionary leap. The People’s War is such a means of eliminating the old by a new force and of taking a leap towards a new and higher social system.”

Why then did the Maoist party enter the peace process and attempt to change society through Constituent Assembly elections?

Baburam Bhattarai: This is a very important question related to the basic tenets of Marxism-Leninism-Maoism (MLM).

The basic motive force of history is the contradiction between the existing level of productive forces and the production relations within society. At a certain stage this contradiction sharpens and there is a break with the old relationship and a leap to the new one. We call this social revolution. That leap necessarily confronts a certain force, because every set of productive relations is backed by a state, and the state means basically the organised force of the army.

To break with the old mode of production and leap into a new one, you have to break all the relations within the state backed by the army. And that inevitably requires the use of force. This is a law of history and a basic principle of MLM which nobody can revise. If you revise or abandon it then you are no longer a Marxist. There is no question of our party ever ending this basic principle.

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The Andolan in Kathmandu and the Revolution to Follow

The following article by Gary Leupp is from CounterPunch. Please see his previous article, Nepal: The Tactic of General Insurrection:

“So far,” notes Peter Lee of the Asia Times, “Western media have reported remotely and somewhat uncomprehendingly on the massive demonstrations in Kathmandu led by the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), with a marked lack of interest. This perhaps reflects the shared desire of the Indian, Chinese and Western governments not to inflame the situation with excessive attention and rhetoric.” He refers to the two-day action in the Nepali capital Thursday and Friday.

But those demonstrations should be of enormous interest.  According to AsiaNews, “The second phase of the so-called ‘people’s movement-III’ saw more than 150,000 participants, including former Maoist guerrillas and United Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist (UCPM-M) members of parliament and militants, gathered around the  Singha Durbar, Nepal’s official seat of government.”

The Maoists virtually paralyzed the government in a stunning display of power. All the top Maoist leaders marched through the city, some meeting the police at the barricades and breaking through  to assume positions around Singha Durbar where they addressed the huge crowd.

It was overwhelming a peaceful, even festive andolan or mass demonstration, although there were some clashes with police. A senior Maoist leader, Krishna Bahadur Mahara, was among those wounded. He told Agence France-Presse, “We are now giving the government and other parties an opportunity to look into our demands.  The ball is in the government’s court.” The most powerful Maoist figure, former prime minister Prachanda, issued a sharper warning to the regime, giving it a seven-day ultimatum (to November 20) to restore “civilian supremacy” or face a general strike and other strong protests.

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Prachanda in London

The following is part of a talk given by Prachanda, the leader of the Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), in London:

Nepali Maoists’ National Convention: Unity-Struggle-Unity

1402462909_1087aebfe2The following is reposted here from the Kasama blog and is originally from Red Star #19, a newspaper of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The CPN-Maoist held a national convention in November to determine the way forward from their current position in the lead of a revolutionary coalition government following a ten-year people’s war. This article, from the Report section of Red Star #19, was originally titled “National convention paves the way“ and is one of several from Red Star on the National Convention, a major meeting on the future of the revolution in Nepal. The article provides a clear example of the practice of the Leninist principle of democratic centralism and the method of unity-struggle-unity, which according to Mao Zedong “means starting from the desire for unity, resolving contradictions through criticism or struggle, and arriving at a new unity on a new basis.”

by Dipak Sapkota

KHARIPATI, BHAKTAPUR — The ‘People’s Federal Democratic National Republic’ is now the working policy of Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The six-day long national convention of the party concluded on Nov. 26, and decided on the new policy, which in short can also be called the ‘Republic of the People’. The party went through very intensive inner struggle but, at the end, the party came out more united and galvanised.

The convention was held in Kharipati, about 15 KM from Kathmandu city. Roughly 1100 regional bureau level cadres from all 13 state committees and party central advisers took part.

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CPN (Maoist) national convention: beginning the great debate

imga0397The following article by Indra Mohan Sigdel ‘Basanta’ is from The Red Star, a newspaper of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The CPN-Maoist is at the head of a revolutionary coalition government following a decade-long people’s war. This article goes into the results of the recent national convention of the CPN-Maoist which set itself the task of debating how to move forward with the revolution:

The Nepalese People’s Revolution is now at a crucial juncture, full of opportunities and challenges. On the one hand, the possibilities are so great that the party’s success to develop a scientific ideological and political line consistent with the present objective condition could lead the Nepalese people’s revolution to a victorious accomplishment. And also, it could be a new opening of the world proletarian revolution in the beginning of the twenty-first century. While on the other hand, its failure to do so would lead to a disastrous consequence leading to an extensive demoralisation of the oppressed classes not only in Nepal but the world over. Therefore, in short, the recent National Convention of our party, the CPN (Maoist), has had an international dimension.

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CPN-Maoist Cde. Bastola: On Election Tactics and Ongoing Class War

CPN-Maoist Prachanda, now Prime Minister, pictured here with the People's Liberation Army

CPN-Maoist Chairman Prachanda, now Prime Minister of Nepal, pictured here with the People's Liberation Army

Thanks to Revolution in South Asia for posting this significant interview, by the World Peoples Resistance Movement (Britain), with Comrade Bastola, a member of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) central committee. It is a little dated, from June 2008, but it is packed with interesting information and analysis. This interview was published on the Maoist Revolution e-list.

Q: What is the situation in Nepal?

A: Regarding the Constituent Assembly elections, they did not expect that results in the election would be like this. The biggest party, the CPN (Maoist), is in such a position that if you aggregate even the number of elected persons of the Congress [Nepal Congress party] and the UML [United Marxist-Leninist party] they are smaller in number than the [Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)] CPN(M) candidates in the elections. Why did this happen, when they didn’t want to be in a position to hold the election unless they are ensured that they would win. That was the situation. What happened then? News agencies were investigating as to who was going to win the election and these agencies were suggesting that the Maoists would win just ten to fifteen seats. They predicted that Maoists in any condition would not win more than twenty seats. That’s what the critics were expecting. Continue reading