Tag Archives: South Asia

Revolution in India: Interview with CPI-Maoist Leader Ganapathi

3562_naxal-1The following interview with Communist Party of India (Maoist) leader Ganapathi (Mupalla Laxman Rao) is from Open Magazine, by Rahul Pandita, October 17, 2009:

“We Shall Certainly Defeat the Government”

Somewhere in the impregnable jungles of Dandakaranya, the supreme commander of CPI (Maoist) spoke to Open on issues ranging from the Government’s proposed anti-Naxal offensive to Islamist Jihadist movements

The supreme commander of CPI (Maoist) talks to Open in his first-ever interview.

At first sight, Mupalla Laxman Rao, who is about to turn 60, looks like a school teacher. In fact, he was one in the early 1970s in Andhra Pradesh’s Karimnagar district. In 2009, however, the bespectacled, soft-spoken figure is India’s Most Wanted Man. He runs one of the world’s largest Left insurgencies—a man known in Home Ministry dossiers as Ganapathi; a man whose writ runs large through 15 states. The supreme commander of CPI (Maoist) is a science graduate and holds a B Ed degree as well. He still conducts classes, but now they are on guerilla warfare for other senior Maoists. He replaced the founder of the People’s War Group, Kondapalli Seetharaamiah, as the party’s general-secretary in 1991. Ganapathi is known to change his location frequently, and intelligence reports say he has been spotted in cities like Hyderabad, Kolkata and Kochi. After months of attempts, Ganapathi agreed to give his first-ever interview. Somewhere in the impregnable jungles of Dandakaranya, he spoke to RAHUL PANDITA on issues ranging from the Government’s proposed anti-Naxal offensive to Islamist Jihadist movements.

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Nepali Maoists’ National Convention: Unity-Struggle-Unity

1402462909_1087aebfe2The following is reposted here from the Kasama blog and is originally from Red Star #19, a newspaper of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The CPN-Maoist held a national convention in November to determine the way forward from their current position in the lead of a revolutionary coalition government following a ten-year people’s war. This article, from the Report section of Red Star #19, was originally titled “National convention paves the way“ and is one of several from Red Star on the National Convention, a major meeting on the future of the revolution in Nepal. The article provides a clear example of the practice of the Leninist principle of democratic centralism and the method of unity-struggle-unity, which according to Mao Zedong “means starting from the desire for unity, resolving contradictions through criticism or struggle, and arriving at a new unity on a new basis.”

by Dipak Sapkota

KHARIPATI, BHAKTAPUR — The ‘People’s Federal Democratic National Republic’ is now the working policy of Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The six-day long national convention of the party concluded on Nov. 26, and decided on the new policy, which in short can also be called the ‘Republic of the People’. The party went through very intensive inner struggle but, at the end, the party came out more united and galvanised.

The convention was held in Kharipati, about 15 KM from Kathmandu city. Roughly 1100 regional bureau level cadres from all 13 state committees and party central advisers took part.

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CPN (Maoist) national convention: beginning the great debate

imga0397The following article by Indra Mohan Sigdel ‘Basanta’ is from The Red Star, a newspaper of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The CPN-Maoist is at the head of a revolutionary coalition government following a decade-long people’s war. This article goes into the results of the recent national convention of the CPN-Maoist which set itself the task of debating how to move forward with the revolution:

The Nepalese People’s Revolution is now at a crucial juncture, full of opportunities and challenges. On the one hand, the possibilities are so great that the party’s success to develop a scientific ideological and political line consistent with the present objective condition could lead the Nepalese people’s revolution to a victorious accomplishment. And also, it could be a new opening of the world proletarian revolution in the beginning of the twenty-first century. While on the other hand, its failure to do so would lead to a disastrous consequence leading to an extensive demoralisation of the oppressed classes not only in Nepal but the world over. Therefore, in short, the recent National Convention of our party, the CPN (Maoist), has had an international dimension.

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Reform or Revolution: The Debate in the CPN-Maoist

The following article, “The party debate : revolution or reform” by Kul Prasad KC ‘Sonam’ is from The Red Star, a newspaper of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The CPN-Maoist are now leading a coalition government to draft a new constitution after fighting a decade-long people’s war with their People’s Liberation Army. This article reflects a very important two-line struggle within the CPN-Maoist that has come into the open about how to move forward. For some background on the revolutionary struggle in Nepal please see my other posts on Nepal.

The party debate : revolution or reform

- Kul Prasad KC ‘Sonam’

Nepal is still in a semi-colonial and semi-feudal state. No drastic change has occurred; there can be no change in contradiction in the political situation until there is a fundamental change in the mode of production. Therefore, in this type of political situation, there are still the same solutions; national and sovereign independence against semi-colonial domination. So, this is the situation of the Democratic People’s Movement.

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Report on Investigation of Anti-Displacement Movement in India

The following is from MR Zine:

India’s Combative Anti-Displacement Movement

by David Pugh

I recently spent three weeks gathering information about the anti-displacement movement in India.  As a guest of Visthapan Virodhi Jan Vikas Andolan (People’s Movement against Displacement and for Development), I traveled across central and eastern India visiting the sites of proposed industrial and mining projects, Special Economic Zones, and real estate developments.  I spoke with hundreds of villagers who are threatened with displacement and with many dedicated activists who are helping to organize the people’s resistance.

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Celebrate the Birth Centenary of Comrade Amulya Sen

The Marxist-Leninist recieved the following from the Com. Amulya Sen Birth Centenary Celebration Committee. It is interesting in its discussion of some of the history of the movement in India. The Indian revolution is composed of a number of ML parties and organizations operating throughout the country, with some conducting armed struggle. The Indian revolution is growing and revolutionaries in the U.S. should support it.    

Celebrate Birth Centenary of Comrade Amulya Sen

Comrades and Friends,

This year, 2008 is the birth centenary of Com. Amulya Sen, the freedom fighter and the communist revolutionary of India.

Com. Sen was born in 1908 in Sonarang village of Bikrampur of Dhaka district in present Bangladesh. He completed his formal education after obtaining gold medal in B.Sc. and 1st class in B.T examinations from the University of Dhaka. However, leaving a comfortable and peaceful life, in his youth Com. Sen rushed to the revolutionary armed struggle against British imperialism with a dream of an independent India, and took the membership of ‘Anushilan Samity’. Continue reading

CPN-Maoist Cde. Bastola: On Election Tactics and Ongoing Class War

CPN-Maoist Prachanda, now Prime Minister, pictured here with the People's Liberation Army

CPN-Maoist Chairman Prachanda, now Prime Minister of Nepal, pictured here with the People's Liberation Army

Thanks to Revolution in South Asia for posting this significant interview, by the World Peoples Resistance Movement (Britain), with Comrade Bastola, a member of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) central committee. It is a little dated, from June 2008, but it is packed with interesting information and analysis. This interview was published on the Maoist Revolution e-list.

Q: What is the situation in Nepal?

A: Regarding the Constituent Assembly elections, they did not expect that results in the election would be like this. The biggest party, the CPN (Maoist), is in such a position that if you aggregate even the number of elected persons of the Congress [Nepal Congress party] and the UML [United Marxist-Leninist party] they are smaller in number than the [Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)] CPN(M) candidates in the elections. Why did this happen, when they didn’t want to be in a position to hold the election unless they are ensured that they would win. That was the situation. What happened then? News agencies were investigating as to who was going to win the election and these agencies were suggesting that the Maoists would win just ten to fifteen seats. They predicted that Maoists in any condition would not win more than twenty seats. That’s what the critics were expecting. Continue reading

Questions and Answers with Comrade Prachanda

Thanks to Revolution in South Asia for posting these videos from the Q&A section of Comrade Prachanda’s speaking event at the New School in NYC, September 26th. After leading the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) and the People’s Liberation Army in a decade long People’s War to topple the hated monarchy, Prachanda was elected Prime Minister of a revolutionary coalition government charged with writing a new constitution. The audio of the program is available as well. The video below is in five parts.

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We are being encircled by the reactionaries: Interview with Comrade Basanta

The following interview is from the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)’s paper, The Red Star:

We are being encircled by the reactionaries

– Indramohan Sigdel ‘Basanta’,

Central Committee Member, CPN (Maoist)

The CPN (Maoist) is now at the stage of peaceful revolution. Revolution in itself is meant to politically overthrow the enemy from state power. How can you recognize your enemy at this peaceful stage?

Generally speaking, the revolution is meant to violently overthrow the class enemy from the state power. However, one must not one-sidedly understand that the revolution necessarily takes a violent form all through its course. The form of struggle is determined not by the subjective wish of the struggling forces but of course by the objective condition and the balance of forces at the given period. At a certain juncture and certain condition, the revolution can develop in a peaceful way. Our participation in the two negotiations in the past and the present peace process are examples of peaceful development of revolution. Nevertheless, it is wrong to categorically separate revolution as two distinct stages, the violent or peaceful, as your question points to. Continue reading

Revolution in India

The following article is from Himal Southasian. It is written from the perspective of an Indian NGO and pro-Indian government think tank, the Institute for Conflict Management. The article is interesting, and my posting it here is for informational purposes only. This is absolutely not an endorsement of the views expressed within, and it should be understood that such an article may contain misinformation.

The riot of red flags

By: Ajai Sahni

The strategies and tactics of the Naxalites are there for all to see, but the Indian establishment is yet to understand this agenda of ‘protracted warfare’.

India’s Naxalite movement – to which contemporary Indian Maoists directly trace their lineage – emerged as a wildfire insurrection in 1967 in the Naxalbari area of North Bengal. After a few years of dramatic violence, however, that movement was comprehensively suppressed by 1973, with the entire top leadership of what was then the Communist Party of India (Marxist-Leninist), either jailed or dead. What little remained of its splintered survivor organisations was destroyed during Indira Gandhi’s Emergency of 1975. It was with the formation in 1980 of the People’s War Group (PWG) – under the leadership of Kondapalli Seetharamaiah, an erstwhile Central Organising Committee member of the CPI (ML), in the Telengana region of Andhra Pradesh – and the reorganisation of the Maoist Communist Centre (MCC) in Bihar in the mid-1980s, that the movement resurfaced in some strength. Continue reading